FASHION COMPLIANCE

Helping designers, retailers and importers understand the rules governing apparel so they can avoid the pitfalls of non-compliance with regulations when selling apparel or home fashions in the usa

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Washington DC Gets Ready to Discuss AGOA, Textiles From Africa, and More
On Friday August 1, 2014, the Civil Society of the AGOA Forum will be hosting its own two-day meeting under the theme “AGOA: Re-Authorization beyond 2015.”  Time is running out to register but you still can here.
The purpose of this meeting is to come up with written recommendations for presentation to the Ministerial Session of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) during the Africa Summit beginning August 5, 2014.
As described by the AGOA Civil Society Network, the AGOA “is a trade mechanism that was passed by the US Government in 2000 to encourage US-Africa trade.
-          AGOA currently provides the 40 AGOA-eligible countries with:
-          Most liberal access to US markets for any country or region without at free trade agreement
-          Reinforced Africa reform and development efforts, and
-          Access to US credit and technical expertise.”
Other posts related to AGOA and textiles can be found here.
The Foundation for Democracy in Africa is likewise hosting an event entitled “AGOA CSO Session: 13th US-Africa Trade and Economic Cooperation AGOA Forum.  This event will have a focus on human rights and democratic reform, among other topics.  Tickets are free but registration is required.
Questions or comments? Post below or email me at clark.deanna@gmail.com
Keep up with me at www.fashioncompliance.com or:
On Facebook at www.facebook.com/FashionCompliance
On Twitter @fashcompliance

Washington DC Gets Ready to Discuss AGOA, Textiles From Africa, and More

On Friday August 1, 2014, the Civil Society of the AGOA Forum will be hosting its own two-day meeting under the theme “AGOA: Re-Authorization beyond 2015.”  Time is running out to register but you still can here.

The purpose of this meeting is to come up with written recommendations for presentation to the Ministerial Session of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) during the Africa Summit beginning August 5, 2014.

As described by the AGOA Civil Society Network, the AGOA “is a trade mechanism that was passed by the US Government in 2000 to encourage US-Africa trade.

-          AGOA currently provides the 40 AGOA-eligible countries with:

-          Most liberal access to US markets for any country or region without at free trade agreement

-          Reinforced Africa reform and development efforts, and

-          Access to US credit and technical expertise.”

Other posts related to AGOA and textiles can be found here.

The Foundation for Democracy in Africa is likewise hosting an event entitled “AGOA CSO Session: 13th US-Africa Trade and Economic Cooperation AGOA Forum.  This event will have a focus on human rights and democratic reform, among other topics.  Tickets are free but registration is required.

Questions or comments? Post below or email me at clark.deanna@gmail.com

Keep up with me at www.fashioncompliance.com or:

On Facebook at www.facebook.com/FashionCompliance

On Twitter @fashcompliance

Filed under Africa trade Trade Agreement AGOA fashion textiles apparel fashion compliance deanna clark international trade imports

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Lots of comments coming out of the “Sourcing Outside of China” seminar at Texworld.

"There’s been a 77% wage increase in Bangladesh on garment workers" Jeff Kreindell


“Vietnam is 2nd largest source of apparel manufacturing for US”


“44 of African counties are AGOA members and 5 of them are seriously taking advantage of the trade agreement”


“PVH and Vanity Fair are starting production in #Africa”


“The apparel biz is driven by product and price and Bangladesh is the lowest cost price for labor in the world - even w/77% wage increase”


“But goods exported from #Bangladesh are a small percentage of total apparel sources.” Does thinking relatively serve any good?

Filed under fashion apparel textiles manufacturing Africa Bangladesh Fashion Compliance imports sourcing sustainability

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Is Your Scarf Flammable? Women’s Scarves Recalled Due to Flammability Hazard

Do you have one of these cute scarves? 

If so, be advised that there’s been at least 1 report of these scarves catching fire and they have now been recalled by the Consumer Product Safety Commission as they failed to meet the federal flammability standard for wearing apparel and therefore, pose a risk of burn injury to consumers.

Both the Julie Vos “Sierra” and “Anchor” style scarves have been recalled.

The scarves are 100 percent modal fabric, a type of rayon, and were sold in two prints, Anchor and Sierra. Anchor was sold in three colors, including blue, green and orange.

Sierra was sold in four colors, including raspberry/magenta, orange/peach, cream/gray and blue/purple. The scarves measure 75 inches long by 45 inches wide. Julie Vos is printed on a tag sewn into the back of the scarf.

Manufactured in India, these imported scarves have been sold at specialty boutiques across the country and online at www.julievos.com from January 2014 through February 2014 for about $165. 

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled scarves and contact Julie Vos to arrange to return the scarves for a full refund. Julie Vos will provide a pre-paid postage label for shipping.

More information on the product recall may be found here:  http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2014/Womens-Scarves-Recalled-by-Julie-Vos/#remedy

Filed under scarves flammable fashion fashion compliance flammability deanna clark fashion law CPSC Consumer Product Safety Commission product recall import