FASHION COMPLIANCE

Helping designers, retailers and importers understand the rules governing apparel so they can avoid the pitfalls of non-compliance with regulations when selling apparel or home fashions in the usa

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Does a Country With People Who Have Smaller Hands Have a Competitive Advantage in Manufacturing?
This was one of many thought provoking questions that came up during my recent discussion with Mr. Theo Samuels-Hunt, a Senior International Trade Specialist at the U.S. Department of Commerce based in Philadelphia.
According to a source of his that did substantive training of the Chinese many decades ago in sewing and textile manufacturing,
“You can train anyone to sew but if you do not have an innate physical ability, e.g., smaller hands to do more delicate work, that work cannot be done.”
And apparently, the Chinese and Italians have smaller hands according to source, which enable them to do more detailed work, as would someone from Ethiopia or Somalia.
Interesting…
Other less anecdotal but equally interesting comments shared revolved around the many benefits for exporters who use his office.
Generally speaking, he works with companies to help them learn how to export and to find foreign buyers in overseas markets.  This typically means working with the overseas commercial officers in U.S. embassies who know the “movers and shakers” in the local foreign market and can therefore identify those companies that could be a “match” for the U.S. supplier looking to sell there.
U.S. manufacturers are eligible for his assistance when they have at least 50% of the value of their content as originating from the United States.  
50% does not mean that 50% of the raw materials of the product must originate from the U.S. but rather, this 50%+ figure takes into account the value of other variables that contribute to a product such as it’s 
- Research and design
- Intellectual Property
- Marketing
Theo is in the “Textile, Apparel and Sports” team in his office which means he works particularly close with companies in these areas and in particular, those dealing in industrial textiles, which would include yarns and fabrics for articles like military garments, architectural fabrics such as for shades and blinds, shoe (leather) companies, automotive and space fabric made goods and even a well-known wedding gown manufacturer.
Interested in learning more about how to export?  Theo can be reached at theo.hunte@trade.gov
Questions/comments?  
Keep up with me at www.fashioncompliance.com or:
On Facebook at www.facebook.com/FashionCompliance
On Twitter @fashcompliance

Does a Country With People Who Have Smaller Hands Have a Competitive Advantage in Manufacturing?

This was one of many thought provoking questions that came up during my recent discussion with Mr. Theo Samuels-Hunt, a Senior International Trade Specialist at the U.S. Department of Commerce based in Philadelphia.

According to a source of his that did substantive training of the Chinese many decades ago in sewing and textile manufacturing,

“You can train anyone to sew but if you do not have an innate physical ability, e.g., smaller hands to do more delicate work, that work cannot be done.”

And apparently, the Chinese and Italians have smaller hands according to source, which enable them to do more detailed work, as would someone from Ethiopia or Somalia.

Interesting…

Other less anecdotal but equally interesting comments shared revolved around the many benefits for exporters who use his office.

Generally speaking, he works with companies to help them learn how to export and to find foreign buyers in overseas markets.  This typically means working with the overseas commercial officers in U.S. embassies who know the “movers and shakers” in the local foreign market and can therefore identify those companies that could be a “match” for the U.S. supplier looking to sell there.

U.S. manufacturers are eligible for his assistance when they have at least 50% of the value of their content as originating from the United States. 

50% does not mean that 50% of the raw materials of the product must originate from the U.S. but rather, this 50%+ figure takes into account the value of other variables that contribute to a product such as it’s

- Research and design

- Intellectual Property

- Marketing

Theo is in the “Textile, Apparel and Sports” team in his office which means he works particularly close with companies in these areas and in particular, those dealing in industrial textiles, which would include yarns and fabrics for articles like military garments, architectural fabrics such as for shades and blinds, shoe (leather) companies, automotive and space fabric made goods and even a well-known wedding gown manufacturer.

Interested in learning more about how to export?  Theo can be reached at theo.hunte@trade.gov

Questions/comments? 

Keep up with me at www.fashioncompliance.com or:

On Facebook at www.facebook.com/FashionCompliance

On Twitter @fashcompliance

Filed under fashion international trade fashion law apparel textiles exports imports law fashion compliance deanna clark attorney department of commerce export assistance

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This week marks the fifty-eighth (58th) session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) which is taking place at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City from March 10 – 21, 2014.
Obviously in the context of fashion and international trade, the role of women is paramount to the industry and the manufacture of wearing apparel.
 I had the privilege of attending together with the Hon. Weatherspoon (next to me in photo) a briefing by the U.S. Mission’s delegates to the CSW conference, which included Ambassadors Cousens, Russel and King (center of photo), and Sharon Kotok.
"Countries where women can reach their full potential are more stable."
On the U.S. agenda, priorities include the adoption of the agreed conclusions from 2013 without any erosion to them (Draft Version).  Other priorities are in 3 specific areas:
1) Gender Based Violence: Includes intimate partner violence and a “national action plan” for women and security – don’t be fooled by the language however, according to a source of mine, while this is called a “national” plan, it does not actually include any plan for U.S. women.
2) Women’s Economic Empowerment: Shifting the focus to women as drivers of economic empowerment and agents of change.  Also, to knock down barriers women face, including
-         A lack of meaningful decision making at every level
-         Women’s leadership in government
-         A lack of access to credit
-         A lack of access to education
-         Inheritance laws (I witnessed this first hand in my own family)
-         Marriage laws (luckily, no pressure there!)
3) Adolescent Girls: This looks directly at child marriage and keeping girls in school, since by staying in they are more likely to have economic empowerment and more likely to support their community (as compared to men – not my words)
For more information about the CSW click here.
Questions/comments?  Post below or email me at clark.deanna@gmail.com
Keep up with me at www.fashioncompliance.com or:
On Facebook at www.facebook.com/FashionCompliance
On Twitter @fashcompliance

This week marks the fifty-eighth (58th) session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) which is taking place at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City from March 10 – 21, 2014.

Obviously in the context of fashion and international trade, the role of women is paramount to the industry and the manufacture of wearing apparel.

 I had the privilege of attending together with the Hon. Weatherspoon (next to me in photo) a briefing by the U.S. Mission’s delegates to the CSW conference, which included Ambassadors Cousens, Russel and King (center of photo), and Sharon Kotok.

"Countries where women can reach their full potential are more stable."

On the U.S. agenda, priorities include the adoption of the agreed conclusions from 2013 without any erosion to them (Draft Version).  Other priorities are in 3 specific areas:

1) Gender Based Violence: Includes intimate partner violence and a “national action plan” for women and security – don’t be fooled by the language however, according to a source of mine, while this is called a “national” plan, it does not actually include any plan for U.S. women.

2) Women’s Economic Empowerment: Shifting the focus to women as drivers of economic empowerment and agents of change.  Also, to knock down barriers women face, including

  • -         A lack of meaningful decision making at every level
  • -         Women’s leadership in government
  • -         A lack of access to credit
  • -         A lack of access to education
  • -         Inheritance laws (I witnessed this first hand in my own family)
  • -         Marriage laws (luckily, no pressure there!)

3) Adolescent Girls: This looks directly at child marriage and keeping girls in school, since by staying in they are more likely to have economic empowerment and more likely to support their community (as compared to men – not my words)

For more information about the CSW click here.

Questions/comments?  Post below or email me at clark.deanna@gmail.com

Keep up with me at www.fashioncompliance.com or:

On Facebook at www.facebook.com/FashionCompliance

On Twitter @fashcompliance

Filed under Commission on the Status of Women CSW United Nations UN UN Women fashion compliance fashion apparel international trade deanna clark fashion law